Engineers link servers to data center chillers

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory engineers are experimenting with a way to deliver just the right amount of cooling to computing equipment.

10/21/2009


 

According to a story in Computerworld , an engineering team led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has successfully tested a novel system that could greatly improve the efficiency of data center cooling.
Most data centers err on the side of caution and cool their equipment more than they need to, thus wasting energy and money . But Lawrence Berkeley engineers, working with Intel Corp., Hewlett-Packard Co., IBM, and Emerson Network Power, are experimenting with a way to deliver just the right amount of cooling to computing equipment.
They fed temperature readings from sensors that are built into most modern servers directly into the data center building controls so the air conditioning system could keep the facility at the optimal temperature to cool the servers.
Read the full story.



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