Electrical

Electrical November 1, 2000

Cabling Infrastructure Supports Mission-Critical Center

When ViaSat, Inc., planned its new headquarters in Carlsbad, Calif., the company-which designs and produces digital communication products-needed a strong telecommunications infrastructure to support its needs.According to ViaSat network administrator Brent Barker, the company was looking for a cabling system that could offer maximum transmission efficiency, easy installation and easy management.

By Staff
Electrical November 1, 2000

Cutting-Edge Fire Protection for Asian Airport

Korea's Inchon International Airport is bidding to become the center of regional aviation-and a hub of both the Northern Pacific route to America and the Polar route to Europe. The facility, including its fire-alarm system, has been designed for the 21st Century.

By Staff
Electrical November 1, 2000

Answering the Central Question

Examples of centralized and distributed strategies permeate our environment. Even our own bodies are arranged with a central cardiopulmonary apparatus, widely distributed sweat glands and regional lymph nodes.

By George P. Karidis, P.E. and John D. Richards, P.E. SmithGroup Detroit
Electrical November 1, 2000

Power Play

With electric deregulation becoming a reality in an increasing number of states, several of our larger clients have approached us for help in restructuring their electric service to best take advantage of the deregulated environment.

By ALLAN HASKELL P.E., Principal, JERRY DAUGHERTY P.E., Engineer and NORMAN MILLER, Director of Marketing, Fosdick Hilmer, Inc., Cincinnati, OH
Electrical November 1, 2000

Consortium Studies Lighting

While studies have shown a correlation between the well-being of employees and their exposure to brightness, glare and daylight, no causal evidence has conclusively linked lighting to worker productivity.

By Staff
Electrical November 1, 2000

What’s So Hot About Chilled-Water Storage?

If power companies around the world are still offering customer incentives to reduce peak demand, when it comes to larger chilled-water cooling systems, why are so many mechanical engineers ignoring the money-saving advantages and other significant benefits of chilled-water storage (CWS)? Often, new facilities that seem particularly suitable for CWS are being designed to employ conventional, nonstorage cooling systems. Admittedly, there aren’t that many papers available documenting the reputed savings, but many happy owners using thermal-energy storage (TES) know that, as compared to their previous cooling systems, they: Moreover, when adapted properly to the circumstances, CWS also offers competitive front-end and life-cycle costs. Put together, that’s a pretty hot case for CWS and TES. Favorable off-peak, load-leveling power rates that lead to significant operating economies are the advantage most often cited for TES.

By JOHN M. CHANEY, Jr., P.E. , Director, Mechanical Engineering, Hayes, Seay, Mattern Mattern, Inc., Roanoke, Va.
Electrical November 1, 2000

A Better Approach to Harmonics Considered Too High?

I read with interest the Specifier's Notebook, "Moving Harmonics Out Of Harm's Way," in the October issue of Consulting-Specifying Engineer. Having written an article on harmonics ("Waving Goodbye to Harmonics," (February 1996), I always take an interest in other viewpoints.

By Staff
Electrical November 1, 2000

Substations and Feasibility

The economic feasibility of converting a substation from distribution to transmission service can be determined from the following relationship:NAS = SAV + DEREG - CONV - OM, where:NAS = Net annual savings.SAV = Annual savings due to switching from the distribution tariff to the transmission tariff.DEREG = Estimated annual savings due to buying power in a deregulated environment.

By Consulting Specifying Engineer Staff
Electrical November 1, 2000

Turf Wars Between Design Professionals

As if architects and engineers did not have enough of their own problems in the form of liability suits, competition from contractors and the growth of design/build, the design professionals are now "at war" with other sectors of their own community.A few years ago the battleground involved architects and engineers, and focused on which profession had the legal right to design buildings.

By MILTON F. LUNCH, Former General Counsel, National Society of Professional Engineers
Electrical November 1, 2000

Shop Drawing “Approval” Liability

One of the most common questions that engineers-and architects-ask is whether to mark shop drawings and other submittals "approved," or whether to take some lesser action. This is an area in which legal advice has changed over the years.

By MARK C. FRIEDLANDER, Schiff Hardin & Waite, Chicago