Retrocommissioning standards released

NEBB issues procedural standards on retrocommissioning to save the environment while saving building owners money.

By SOURCE: NEBB May 20, 2009

According

to the National Environmental Balancing Bureau (NEBB) ,

owners of the nearly 5 million commercial buildings in the United States

can reduce their impact on the environment by as much as 30% through

retrocommissioning, a process that ensures that all HVAC and integrated

building controls are operating a peak performance. To assist in saving

building owners money and reducing the impact on the environment, NEBB has

issued Procedural Standards for Retrocommissioning of Existing Buildings to provide direction and standards for performing

retrocommissioning services for existing buildings.

 

The NEBB

Procedural Standards for Retrocommissioning of Existing Buildings establishes

a uniform and systematic set of criteria for the performance of the

Retrocommissioning (RCx-EB) process when applied to existing building systems

such as a building’s mechanical, electrical, and building envelop systems.

 

The

standards are divided into three parts. Part 1, Standards, covers definitions,

requirements for quality control, quality compliance, instrumentation

requirements, and report requirements. Requirements for instruments and test

equipment are identified. Part 2, Process, is devoted to providing a detailed

explanation of the retrocommissioning process. Part 3, Procedures, cover the

technical procedures for retrocommissioning of existing buildings.

 

Release of

this manual has come at a time when governmental agencies, engineers,

architects, and building owners are relying on retrocommissioning as a vehicle

to address issues that prevent existing buildings from meeting their current

facility requirements as well as performing at optimal levels. The NEBB

retrocommissioning procedural standards are designed to provide essential information

to analyze needs and produce desired results.

 

NEBB has

more than 600 certified firms that are working closely with building owners,

architects, engineers, and construction contractors to reduce the environmental

impact of heating and cooling systems on the environment while cutting building

operating costs at the same time.