Resources for the Resourceful –Arc flash

Blog contributor David Sellers discusses the hazards of working with live electrical equipment. Video clips, vivid images, and personal injury stories drive Sellers' point home about electrical safety in the workplace.
By David Sellers, Senior Engineer, Facility Dynamics Engineering February 25, 2009

When working on building systems, exposure to live electrical equipment poses a major risk. Developing a healthy respect for live electrical equipment, along with continuous safety training, should be high on your priority list. In my blog, the graphic pictures and video link illustrate why.

After years of experience around electrical gear, complacency can easily set in. Although electrical gear does not emit the same audible and visual danger signs as a boiler or chiller, the imminent threat is there. Luckily, I’ve only experienced a low level shock of 120 VAC; but even at that level, the power will garner your respect. Friends of mine have not been so lucky and their stories will shock you.

I always want to feel comfortably nervous around electrical equipment; if I’m not nervous or I’m uncomfortable, then I’m dangerous. My theory is the more I know about this, the more aware I will be.

While on the Easy Power website , a free resource is available to the safety-conscious visitor—”Practical Solution Guide to Arc Flash Hazards”. Specifically check out chapters five and six.

If this discussion has made you interested in learning more, you may want to consider the following:
full text of this blog , see the images, and watch the videos ( Video1 , Video2 , Video3 )
Field Guide for Engineers ” blog archives for more instructional content, practical-application solutions, and tales from the field.
Plant Engineering’s Arc Flash University webinar series
Calculating arc flash hazard levels