Shh! The Walls Have Ears…

In this day and age, when technology seems to keep getting smaller and smaller, is it any wonder that someone would introduce a wireless-enabled sensor the size of the dot in this letter "i"? Regardless, the technology is already here, and it's called MEMS (micro electro mechanical system). Kevin Osburn, head of product marketing and development for Siemens Building Technologies, discussed the ...

07/01/2003


In this day and age, when technology seems to keep getting smaller and smaller, is it any wonder that someone would introduce a wireless-enabled sensor the size of the dot in this letter "i"?

Regardless, the technology is already here, and it's called MEMS (micro electro mechanical system). Kevin Osburn, head of product marketing and development for Siemens Building Technologies, discussed the technology in front of an audience of journalists from around the world at the firm's annual press forum in Dallas last month.

The tiny silicon devices combine five capabilities that make them ideal for future BAS (building automation system) configurations: sensing, wireless networking, processing, power efficiency and self-configurability.

The technology has already been proven in other industries. Automotive firms uses MEMS to sense tire pressure while a car is in motion, as well as to control the power of an airbag based on the size and weight of a passenger. In the healthcare realm, MEMS is being used to continuously monitor blood pressure and CO2 in respirators.

Osburn expounded on the possibilities of the sensors for building automation, suggesting that they could potentially eliminate the need for signal wires and power supplies and be placed in multiple areas of a room—perhaps even in the paint on the wall.

Osburn acknowledged that MEMS is expensive in the development stage, but the eventual, potential savings in maintenance and energy, once the technology is applied, are very high.





No comments
Consulting-Specifying Engineer's Product of the Year (POY) contest is the premier award for new products in the HVAC, fire, electrical, and...
Consulting-Specifying Engineer magazine is dedicated to encouraging and recognizing the most talented young individuals...
The MEP Giants program lists the top mechanical, electrical, plumbing, and fire protection engineering firms in the United States.
Designing for energy efficiency; Understanding and applying NFPA 101 for mission critical facilities; Integrating commissioning and testing for fire alarm systems; Optimizing unitary pumping solutions
Economics of HVAC systems; NFPA 110-2016; Designing and choosing modular data centers
Combined heat and power; Assessing replacement of electrical systems; Energy codes and lighting; Salary Survey; Fan efficiency
Tying a microgrid to the smart grid; Paralleling generator systems; Previewing NEC 2017 changes
Driving motor efficiency; Preventing Arc Flash in mission critical facilities; Integrating alternative power and existing electrical systems
Putting COPS into context; Designing medium-voltage electrical systems; Planning and designing resilient, efficient data centers; The nine steps of designing generator fuel systems
As brand protection manager for Eaton’s Electrical Sector, Tom Grace oversees counterfeit awareness...
Amara Rozgus is chief editor and content manager of Consulting-Specifier Engineer magazine.
IEEE power industry experts bring their combined experience in the electrical power industry...
Michael Heinsdorf, P.E., LEED AP, CDT is an Engineering Specification Writer at ARCOM MasterSpec.
Automation Engineer; Wood Group
System Integrator; Cross Integrated Systems Group
Fire & Life Safety Engineer; Technip USA Inc.
click me