Largest gas turbine: 2,838 sensors, 90 GB data per hour of testing

Largest gas turbine, from Siemens, is expected to deliver 530 MW at more than 60% thermal efficiency. Some 2,838 sensors and associated wiring are deployed to monitor the turbine. Of these, 597 turn with the rotor; total data collection during testing amounts to 90 GB/hour. Other sensors include...

02/13/2009


Irsching (near Ingolstadt), Germany – Much is made of the benefits of modular design and construction but not often associated with the large scale of power plants. Yet, this is the path Siemens Energy has taken to bring online the

world’s largest H-class gas turbine, expected to deliver 60%+ thermal efficiency

in combined-cycle operation. That operating mode will come after adding a steam turbine, with full system completion and handover expected in mid-2011.

Siemens’ H-class SGT5-8000H turbine is 440 metric tons and expected to deliver 530 MW.

Thinking BIG generates excitement:

Installed at the Irsching gas power plant, SGT5-8000H gas turbine is a 440 metric ton, 50-Hz machine that outputs 340 MW—and is designed for 530 MW in eventual combined-cycle operation. Control Engineering was fortunate to be able visit Irsching Unit 4 in late-Nov. 2008 to obtain a first-hand progress update from Willibald Fischer, Siemens program manager for H-turbines. The site is Siemens’ turbine Test Center until turnover of the system to German power company E.ON Kraftwerke.
Siemens’ H-class turbine is now in phase 2 endurance/durability testing until mid-year `09, accumulating operating hours and start-up experience, explains Fischer. “This is a semi-commercial operating stage, with tenders ongoing to other customers,” he says.
Instrumentation engineer’s dream: 597 spinning sensors
The Irsching test site is an exciting place for control/instrumentation engineers. Some 2,838 sensors and associated wiring are deployed to monitor the turbine. Of these, 597 turn with the rotor, with data brought out to telemetry units at each end. Most numerous are temperature and pressure sensors (1,688 and 616, respectively), and strain-gages (357), besides accelerometers and other sensors for clearance, blade vibration, and flow/force measurement. All test information goes to onsite computers for monitoring by a small staff; then, data are transmitted for detailed analysis to Siemens facilities in Orlando and Jupiter, FL, and Mülheim, Germany. “Data flow is near real time. One hour of testing produces 90 gigabytes of data,” Fischer explains.

Wired for data collection


With modular construction, the SGT5-8000H currently produces electric output only by shaft power directly coupled to the generator (simple-cycle operation). Through Nov. `08, approximately 250 hours of operation have been logged. Siemens intends to demonstrate reliable turbine operation under cyclic loads, thus daily shutdowns are part of the testing. H turbine is said to be capable of 150-200 starts per year, if needed, but also can deliver 8,000 hours of baseload operation.
The gas turbine’s second output—exhaust to the heat recovery steam generator (boiler)—will come into play during combined-cycle gas turbine (CCGT) operation. Build-out of the CCGT plant begins in mid-2009. However, foundations for the steam turbine, other civil engineering works, an air-intake filtration system, and myriad auxiliary equipment are in place, thanks to modular construction.

Related reading on efficient power generation

- The hunt for 60%+ thermal efficiency (August 2008).
- New, efficient industrial gas turbines coming .

In a single-shaft CCGT plant layout, the steam turbine will connect to the end of the generator opposite the gas turbine. The boiler will be installed behind the gas turbine’s high-temperature exhaust diffuser and connected to the steam turbine by steam piping systems. The boiler, steam turbine, and condenser, are scheduled to arrive in 2010. Program completion date of July 2011 remains on target, as the “steam side” of the plant represents more predictable, standard technology, notes Fischer.
Kilovolts next to millivolts
Test work at Irsching is one of contrasts. “While kilovolts of electricity flow from the system’s output to the grid, just millivolts monitor banks of sensors at other points of the same system to ensure the turbine’s health,” Fischer adds.
Siemens’ investment in H-class gas turbines is projected to be€500 million through the project’s completion. An undertaking of this size is bound to be costly and needs to be viewed as a lease on the future.
Frank J. Bartos , P.E., Consulting Editor
Control Engineering News Desk
Register here to select your choice of eNewsletters free.





No comments
Consulting-Specifying Engineer's Product of the Year (POY) contest is the premier award for new products in the HVAC, fire, electrical, and...
Consulting-Specifying Engineer magazine is dedicated to encouraging and recognizing the most talented young individuals...
The MEP Giants program lists the top mechanical, electrical, plumbing, and fire protection engineering firms in the United States.
High-performance buildings; Building envelope and integration; Electrical, HVAC system integration; Smoke control systems; Using BAS for M&V
Pressure piping systems: Designing with ASME; Lab ventilation; Lighting controls; Reduce energy use with VFDs
Smoke control: Designing for proper ventilation; Smart Grid Standard 201P; Commissioning HVAC systems; Boilers and boiler systems
Case Study Database

Case Study Database

Get more exposure for your case study by uploading it to the Consulting-Specifying Engineer case study database, where end-users can identify relevant solutions and explore what the experts are doing to effectively implement a variety of technology and productivity related projects.

These case studies provide examples of how knowledgeable solution providers have used technology, processes and people to create effective and successful implementations in real-world situations. Case studies can be completed by filling out a simple online form where you can outline the project title, abstract, and full story in 1500 words or less; upload photos, videos and a logo.

Click here to visit the Case Study Database and upload your case study.

Protecting standby generators for mission critical facilities; Selecting energy-efficient transformers; Integrating power monitoring systems; Mitigating harmonics in electrical systems
Commissioning electrical systems in mission critical facilities; Anticipating the Smart Grid; Mitigating arc flash hazards in medium-voltage switchgear; Comparing generator sizing software
Integrating BAS, electrical systems; Electrical system flexibility; Hospital electrical distribution; Electrical system grounding
As brand protection manager for Eaton’s Electrical Sector, Tom Grace oversees counterfeit awareness...
Amara Rozgus is chief editor and content manager of Consulting-Specifier Engineer magazine.
IEEE power industry experts bring their combined experience in the electrical power industry...
Michael Heinsdorf, P.E., LEED AP, CDT is an Engineering Specification Writer at ARCOM MasterSpec.