Auto manufacturer issues American production freeze

Several of Toyota's US facilities will be working on a reduced schedule, with complete plant shutdowns starting as early as Friday, April 15, 2011.

04/12/2011


Getting ready to resume most of the production in Japan, Toyota is at the same time weighing its options for the operations in the US. Severely hit by the damages the quake and tsunami caused on March 11 on the supply chain, Toyota announced the way and manner in which the plants it runs in North America will be affected by the parts shortage.

Starting this week, several US facilities will be working on a reduced schedule, with complete plant shutdowns scheduled for April 15, 18, 21 (except for the Georgetown plant), 22, and 25. Toyota hints at the fact it might have to announce similar moves next month as well.

“The situation in Japan affects many automakers and many other industries. Extraordinary efforts are underway to help suppliers recover,” said Steve St. Angelo, executive vice president of Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing North America.

“We are slowing down to conserve parts yet maintain production as much as possible. We appreciate the flexibility of our team members, suppliers and dealers as we work through these issues.”

In Japan, the auto maker announced it is resuming production starting April 18. By the end of the month, however, on April 27, all plants will shut down again, this time because Toyota Japan is entering the annual spring holiday, which lasts through May 10.

Following that date, the car maker might have to announced further plant shutdowns, as it seems like the supply chain has no chance of being reestablished in the near future.

Originally reported on Autoevolution.com



Consulting-Specifying Engineer's Product of the Year (POY) contest is the premier award for new products in the HVAC, fire, electrical, and...
Consulting-Specifying Engineer magazine is dedicated to encouraging and recognizing the most talented young individuals...
The MEP Giants program lists the top mechanical, electrical, plumbing, and fire protection engineering firms in the United States.
Boiler basics; 2017 Product of the Year winners; Manufacturing facilities Q&A; Building integration; Piping and pumping systems
2017 MEP Giants; Mergers and acquisitions report; ASHRAE 62.1; LEED v4 updates and tips; Understanding overcurrent protection
Integrating electrical and HVAC for energy efficiency; Mixed-use buildings; ASHRAE 90.4; Wireless fire alarms assessment and challenges
Power system design for high-performance buildings; mitigating arc flash hazards
Transformers; Electrical system design; Selecting and sizing transformers; Grounded and ungrounded system design, Paralleling generator systems
Commissioning electrical systems; Designing emergency and standby generator systems; VFDs in high-performance buildings
As brand protection manager for Eaton’s Electrical Sector, Tom Grace oversees counterfeit awareness...
Amara Rozgus is chief editor and content manager of Consulting-Specifier Engineer magazine.
IEEE power industry experts bring their combined experience in the electrical power industry...
Michael Heinsdorf, P.E., LEED AP, CDT is an Engineering Specification Writer at ARCOM MasterSpec.
Automation Engineer; Wood Group
System Integrator; Cross Integrated Systems Group
Fire & Life Safety Engineer; Technip USA Inc.
This course focuses on climate analysis, appropriateness of cooling system selection, and combining cooling systems.
This course will help identify and reveal electrical hazards and identify the solutions to implementing and maintaining a safe work environment.
This course explains how maintaining power and communication systems through emergency power-generation systems is critical.
click me