www.csemag.com: Latest News http://www.csemag.com/ en www.csemag.com: Latest News http://www.csemag.com/typo3conf/ext/tt_news/ext_icon.gif http://www.csemag.com/ 18 16 TYPO3 - get.content.right http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss Tue, 23 May 2017 01:50:00 -0400 Weekly merger, acquisition, deal update: May 19 http://www.csemag.com/single-article/weekly-merger-acquisition-deal-update-may-19/e66fc973aa48d87b01530f9f4061b7da.html This week Morrissey Goodale reported three deals in the U.S. and one international deal involving... Morrissey Goodale reported three deals in the U.S. and one international deal involving two companies from Canada. This week Morrissey Goodale reported three deals in the U.S. and one international deal involving two companies from Canada. Courtesy: Morrissey Goodale M&A Transactions 5/11/2017 DLR Group (Minneapolis, MN) (ENR #84) acquired Kwan Henmi Architecture & Planning (San Francisco, CA), a firm recognized for its modernist design in a variety of building types. The firm will operate as DLR Group | Kwan Henmi and join with DLR to serve the interests of public and private sector clients throughout California. Link to details 5/18/2017 Structural engineering firm, Bennett & Pless (Atlanta, GA), acquired King Guinn Associates (Charlotte, NC), another structural engineering firm. The combined firm will have 44 employees. Link to details 5/16/2017 Environmental service provider, TAS Environmental Services (Fort Worth, TX), acquired Water Kleen Services (Ennis, TX), a leading regional provider of environmental and industrial services. Link to details 5/16/2017 Interior design studio, MartensGroup (Calgary, Canada), joined Kasian (Vancouver, Canada), an integrated architecture, interior design, and planning firm. Link to details]]> Industry Roundup SyndicationType: Article SyndicationType: Press Release - Non-Commercial SyndicationSource: CFE Media (in-house) SyndicationSource: Content Partner - Morrissey Goodale Syndication: Architectural Engineering Firm Syndication: Design Build Engineering Firm Syndication: Consulting and Specifying Engineering Firm SyndicationTopic: Building Types SyndicationIndustry: Building Automation And Facilities Management Fri, 19 May 2017 07:56:00 -0400 The evolving role of commissioning providers http://www.csemag.com/single-article/the-evolving-role-of-commissioning-providers/852a1bf5803d9835c6babf18350bd6cc.html The role of commissioning providers (CxPs) is changing which means more successful project delivery. The market landscape Building commissioning has occupied a niche in the building industry for nearly 3 decades. Initially an unpopular adjunct to commercial construction, driven by “energy conservation” (the stick) and supported through program incentives (the carrot), commissioning materialized as a third-party role to protect building owners. The concept then, as it is now, was to ensure that building systems work—the first time, and all the time. It’s been a bumpy ride, but along the way, commissioning became a generally accepted aspect of project delivery. Commissioning evolved as a relatively straightforward process to validate the performance of HVACR systems. Looking forward, however, CxPs are increasingly tied to complex, interdependent systems, practices, and teaming arrangements due, in large part, to the emergence of complex technical design, construction, and operations solutions. The commissioning landscape is changing right along with the building industry. It’s time to evaluate how the role of CxPs will contribute to successful building industry trends in the future. Those trends, in new construction as well as existing-building improvements, can be divided into the following three groups:  People Relationships: Relationships among project stakeholders are becoming more complicated as construction processes morph, both rapidly and constantly. Few stakeholders have a clear picture of overall project practices. CxPs, as quality assurance experts in system performance and project phases, can unite people across the process and framework. In the future, the design team, CxP, and contractor teams will become more integrated for each project. Large commercial-portfolio owners are hiring commissioning staff to ensure ongoing energy efficiency of their new and existing buildings. Especially in health care and high-tech, these employees are creating the projects, developing the owner’s project requirements (OPR for new construction) or current facility requirements (for existing buildings), and then hiring outside CxPs to assist them with implementation. Most of the work in this market is relationship-based. Architecture, engineering, and construction groups, as well as original equipment manufacturers—like major controls systems manufacturers—are building in-house staff to provide commissioning as part of their “full-service” offerings. Although this strategy appears to impinge upon the role of third-party providers, internal staff generally are not specialists in the requirements and expectations of owners who are not existing clients. Leaseholders of commercial office building space are becoming more sophisticated in terms of the functionality and comfort their space offers. CxPs provide the capabilities necessary to bring buildings up to their most efficient operational state—and keep them there. Integrated practices—new construction Contracting: Contract relationships are continually moving targets right now within the new construction world. The question is how best to deliver a functioning, quality-performance building through a design-bid-build (DBB), design-build (DB), construction management at risk, or progressive design-build process. In new construction, traditional DBB contracting is giving way to a more DB model, which in turn is shifting toward an integrated approach that brings the design team, construction contractor, consultants including the Cxp, owner, and facility manager together to plan and deliver the project. This methodology, known as integrated project design (IPD), enables CxPs to contribute to performance planning early, but also requires them to become familiar with the IPD process and with multiparty contract language. Modeling: The use of building information modeling, virtual and augmented reality, design review, and other approaches to project development can detect and reduce design problems. CxPs understand how systems and assemblies function and can be more engaged in spotting and solving performance issues before they’re irreversibly implemented. Specialization: Sophisticated building automation, energy management, and data analytics on the software side, and onsite energy generation and storage systems on the hardware side, suggest that commissioning general practitioners, are likely to further specialize as energy and building systems, codes, and standards progress. CxPs who specialize in systems beyond HVACR will benefit financially by contributing knowledge and experience to a more holistic approach to the pursuit of high-performing buildings. Value-added Cx practices—existing buildings Value versus ROI: Existing-building commissioning (retro- or recommissioning) in the private sector is being driven by the owner’s bottom line—maximizing a facility’s value if there’s an acceptable ROI. Commercial owners typically hold buildings from 5 to 10 years. The question, which CxPs can help answer, is “How much time and effort should be put into designing and maintaining operation of the building as compared with the savings that result from that effort?” There is a point where the value is insufficient to provide an ROI. Tuning up or replacing systems to modernize and extend building life, retrofitting space and systems to accommodate new occupants, or upgrading energy efficiency to meet benchmarks, rating systems, or codes all represent value/revenue investments. CxPs have the knowledge, skills, and abilities to provide consulting services to owners of existing buildings, helping to revamp operations and bring them to a model that will be as efficient as its systems allow. Policies Long-term efficiency is the goal of government agencies as they endeavor to reduce their carbon footprint by 2030 or 2050. Codes have become the enforcement tools to improve energy efficiency in buildings. The longest and most stringent track record of commissioning code implementation is on the West Coast via the Washington State energy code, Oregon’s Energy Efficiency Specialty Code, and California Title 24. As a result of these codes, CxPs are being asked to validate that the energy efficiency is actually delivered, not just predicted, which requires that the commissioning service evolves into building operation services after the initial project turnover. The role of commissioning providers (CxPs) is changing which means more successful project delivery. The landscape for construction processes is constantly changing to find and launch the best implementation methods to achieve energy efficiency and performance goals when building or remodeling commercial facilities. In addition, owners are seeking the best methodology to maximize ROI, while CxPs are being asked to deliver more value to the process at more competitive fees. Those who have the expertise to meet these changes will benefit the most.
Bruce A. Pitts has more than 40 years of experience in design, project management and commissioning. He is the Group Leader of Wood Harbinger’s mechanical engineering/industrial systems team with a comprehensive project perspective. His diverse portfolio includes new construction and upgrades in office buildings, aviation facilities, medical facilities, college campuses, K-12 schools, computer facilities, and operations, training, and maintenance centers. Bruce currently serves as president of the Building Commissioning Association (BCxA) and is on BCxA’s International Board of Directors. In this position, he is a contributing member of BCxA University, creating curriculum for and teaching their new-building and existing-building commissioning classroom courses. Pitts also teaches courses on many aspects of commissioning at conferences and through webinars. He is also a member of the APPA/BCxA “Building Commissioning Handbook” update committee and the Project Committee for ASHRAE Standard 202-2013, Commissioning Process for Buildings and Systems Commissioning.  ]]>
Slider Homepage Item - CSE Commissioning May SyndicationType: Article SyndicationSource: CFE Media (in-house) Syndication: Commissioning Industry Roundup Syndication: Energy Management (modeling audit tax credits) Thu, 18 May 2017 01:12:00 -0400
Three principles to successful project management http://www.csemag.com/single-article/three-principles-to-successful-project-management/05ffd5ba6de04c1316d2d859a1c6865d.html Respect, praise, and embracing grace is the foundation of effective leadership. An entire industry peddles advice on how to perfect the art of project management—as a new project manager, it’s tough to know where to begin. Through experience, I’ve found that three principles form the foundation of being an effective project manager and leader: 1. Give respect to get respect. As a new project manager in the earlier stages of your career, how do you get team members to respect you in your role? Show respect. You can learn a lot from more seasoned co-workers if you choose to listen. Successful teams are made up of people with a wide range of skills and personalities. Some have qualities that make them strong contributors, while others have skills more suited to management. Experienced team members have seen what it takes to thrive in an organization and have a depth of technical expertise you may not have. Respect their opinions and experience, and you’ll find your team is much more willing to follow your lead on projects. For example, I’ve found that when inviting team members to be my partners in the process, and soliciting their thoughts, projects have proven to be less stressful and more rewarding for everyone. 2. Be generous with praise. Positive feedback is encouraging to team members, affirms good behaviors, and keeps you focused on the many successes of the team.  A recent article published in the Harvard Business Review suggests the ideal praise-to-criticism ratio is approximately 6:1. For every negative comment, at least six positive comments should be provided to keep the team member encouraged. A survey completed by the Boston Consulting Group noted that “appreciation for their work” ranked No. 1 among the top 10 motivators for workers, with salary ranked eight. Delivering all positive feedback in person is a meaningful, bonding moment. In practice, that sort of communication becomes difficult due to busy schedules. Nowadays, using whatever mode of communication is most readily available—a quick email to say “well done,” a quick “great job” at the coffee station, or a “thank you” text—is more practical. It doesn’t matter how the praise is delivered, just that it’s delivered. I always ask myself: What team members do I need to praise today? Rebecca Delaney is the mechanical team leader at Skidmore, Owings & Merrill’s sustainable engineering studio. 3. Embrace grace. This one is a lifelong pursuit if you are a perfectionist, but learning to extend grace not only to yourself but also to team members is critical to being successful. It seems natural to remember each failure, because it’s important to learn from missteps and grow. However, if you begin to dwell on failures or allow the past to define the future, this becomes a problem. We’re not the same person we were yesterday or the person we’ll be tomorrow. Mistakes will be made, and there will be moments when we feel we haven’t succeeded. To counter this way of thinking, it’s important to show sufficient grace to let it go and move forward with a clean slate (and a little extra wisdom). The same applies to your team members. Extending grace means you forgive past conflicts and look forward.  This isn’t to suggest themes of poor performance should be overlooked, but rather that giving second chances acknowledges and accepts that none of us are perfect. It is easy to be hesitant around a co-worker after a conflict, but as the project manager, it’s your role to define the relationship in a positive way. Extending grace to individual team members will have a lasting and significant impact on the whole team.  Building a foundation on these three principles will not prevent you from making mistakes, but will foster a positive culture and make the journey more enjoyable.
Rebecca Delaney is the mechanical team leader at Skidmore, Owings & Merrill’s sustainable engineering studio. She is a hiring manager and engineer recognized for her industry leadership in mentoring students and sharing her passion of engineering around the globe. She was a 2016 40 Under 40 winner.]]>
Home Page Lead News Item Slider Homepage Item - CSE May SyndicationType: Article Career Smart SyndicationTopic: Education and Training Syndication: Education (CEU PDH class training) Industry Roundup Education Center Education Center Videos Tue, 16 May 2017 15:52:00 -0400
Your questions answered: Critical power: Emergency power http://www.csemag.com/single-article/your-questions-answered-critical-power-emergency-power/d3ba9c4223255e4c7dffb5fecdb591e8.html The May 4 “Critical power: Emergency power” Webcast presenters addressed questions not covered... Tom Divine, PE, senior electrical engineer, Smith Seckman Reid Inc., HoustonElectrical engineers must consider many factors when designing emergency power systems. Safety, maintainability, code compliance, and economics play crucial roles in determining the topology of an emergency system for a critical facility. Specific requirements for emergency power vary based on building occupancy type, facility use, and critical function. When designing generator systems, engineers must ensure that the generators and the building electrical systems that they support are appropriate for the specific application. They must make decisions regarding generator sizing, load types, whether generators should be paralleled, fuel storage, switching scenarios, and many other criteria. Emergency power systems provide power to ensure that life safety systems and critical equipment can operate during a power outage. NFPA 70: National Electrical Code (NEC) Article 700: Emergency Systems defines the category that applies to emergency generator power sources. The May 4, 2017, “Critical power: Emergency power” Webcast presenters addressed questions not covered during the live event. The experts are:
  • Tom Divine, PE, senior electrical engineer, Smith Seckman Reid Inc., Houston
  • Freddy Padilla, PE, ATD, principal, MEP engineering director, Page, Austin, Texas
Question: Are fire pumps required to meet the requirements of NFPA 70-2017: National Electrical Code (NEC) Article 700, in addition to Article 695? Freddy Padilla: Fire pumps are not required to meet Article 700. The key point about fire pumps is that you should always check with your authority having jurisdiction (AHJ) to ensure that your source or sources are per NEC Article 695.3. But these sources are not required to comply with Article 700. Q: Why does NFPA 110-2016: Standard for Emergency and Standby Power Systems allow natural gas generators, but NEC Article 700 requires an AHJ exception? Tom Divine: NFPA 110, 2016 edition, Paragraph 5.1.1(3) allows natural or synthetic gas as a fuel source for generating systems. The exception to 5.1.1 requires onsite fuel storage, with automatic transfer to the onsite supply, for Level 1 systems where the probability of fuel delivery interruption is high. A Level 1 system is one whose failure could result in the death or serious injury of a human. In this context, a high probability would be, in fact, a small chance of interruption. In the 2017 edition of the NEC, Paragraph 700.12(B)(3), prohibits the generator for an emergency system from relying strictly on a public utility system for its fuel supply. The exception allows an AHJ to determine or assess the likelihood that the utility electrical supply and the offsite fuel delivery system will fail simultaneously, and, if that probability is, low, to permit the use of other than onsite fuels to serve the prime mover. In practice, these requirements are quite similar: both require onsite fuel storage, unless a determination has been made that offsite fuel delivery is reliable enough to be acceptable to the AHJ as the sole source of fuel for the alternate source. Q: How can we classify mission critical projects, if we are not required to have coordination protection? Padilla: The reliability of mission critical project is not regulated by the AHJ or the NEC. Selective breaker coordination is a requirement that needs to be discuss with your owner. There are several standards that recommend breaker coordination, such as Uptime Institute and TIA-942-A. Remember, unless requested by you (owner), these are only recommendation or good practices, not a requirement of the AHJ. Q: Please list some sample buildings that are typically designated for critical operations power systems (COPS). Divine: The original draft of proposed NEC Article 585, which later became Article 708 in the 2008 NEC, carried a fine print note (FPN) with a fairly extensive list of candidate facilities. That FPN was deleted from the final version, ostensibly out of concern that it would be interpreted as a requirement that all such facilities be classified as critical operations areas requiring a COPS. Under Article 708, the NEC describes installation requirements for a COPS, but doesn’t determine when a COPS is required. That determination is left to other codes, statutes, or determination by a governmental authority. Here’s the list of candidate facilities from the draft of Article 585:
  • Air traffic control centers
  • Central station service facilities (fire and security system monitoring)
  • Chemical, petrochemical, and hazardous material (including biohazard) handling facilities
  • Communications centers, telephone exchanges, and cellular tower sites
  • Emergency evacuation centers
  • Financial, banking, and business data processing facilities
  • Fuel supply pumping stations (i.e., natural gas distribution and delivery infrastructure)
  • Hospitals and associated support facilities
  • Municipal infrastructure: water and sewer treatment facilities, 911 centers, and offices and facilities deemed critical to continuity of government
  • Police, fire, and civil defense facilities including power for radio repeater operations
  • Radio and television stations
  • Transportation infrastructure: airports, rail stations, and seaports.
Q: Should a generator-mounted circuit breaker be directly connected to the same size main breaker within a building? Do these two breakers need to be selectively coordinated because the operation of either breaker will result in the same outage? Padilla: No, these two breakers are in series. See exemption in NEC-2017 Article 700.32. Q: Can you install the emergency generator and the automatic transfer switch in the same room? When designing generator systems, engineers must ensure that the generators and the building electrical systems that they support are appropriate for the specific application. Courtesy: SSRDivine: NFPA 110, 2016 edition, Paragraph 7.2.1, calls for the emergency power supply (EPS), which covers the generator(s), to be installed in a separate room for a Level 1 system. Paragraph 7.2.1.2, though, specifically allows installation of components of the emergency power supply system (EPSS), which includes transfer switches, in the room with the EPS. A Level 1 system is a system whose failure could result in loss of life or serious injury to humans. In the 2010 edition, currently enforced by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for health care facilities, that permission appears in Paragraph 7.2.1. Q: Are fire pumps legally required standby loads? Padilla: No, fire pumps are not legally required load. Fire pump services don’t need to comply with NEC 701. Q: What is the level of selective coordination required for an NEC Article 700.27 system? Divine: Presuming that the reference is to the 2011 edition of the NEC, Article 700.27 requires that emergency system overcurrent devices be “selectively coordinated with all supply side” devices. Selective coordination is defined in the 2011 edition as, “localization of an overcurrent condition to restrict outages to the circuit or equipment affected, accomplished by the choice of overcurrent protective devices and their ratings or settings.” No specific level of coordination is specified, leaving the interpretation to the AHJ. Some enforced the requirement quite strictly, while others allowed for a measure of compromise between selectivity and other objectives. The definition in the 2017 edition is more restrictive, adding the text, “… for the full range of available overcurrents, from overload to the maximum available fault current, and for the full range of overcurrent protective device opening times associated with those overcurrents.” That language is generally interpreted as not allowing for any failure of selectivity under any circumstances—a very demanding requirement. Q: In a COPS facility, is ground fault trip required on the generator and feeders, or is ground fault indication as in health care facilities acceptable? Padilla: If your generator also is used to serve emergency loads, you can take that to eliminate your ground fault protection, but if you are not using the generator for emergency load, you might need to provided ground fault protection. A good option to avoid this requirement is to provide a high resistance ground and your ground fault protection is not required. See NEC Articles 230.95 and 250.36. Also, you can call for an Article 230.96 exception if this applies to your building type.]]>
Slider Homepage Item - CSE Power SyndicationType: Article SyndicationType: Webcast SyndicationSource: CFE Media (in-house) SyndicationSource: Content Partner - Page Syndication: Codes and Standards (Electrical Power) SyndicationTopic: Power SyndicationTopic: Codes and Standards Industry Roundup Mon, 15 May 2017 11:37:00 -0400
2017 40 Under 40 Winners announced http://www.csemag.com/events-and-awards/40-under-40/2017-40-under-40-winners.html The 2017 40 Under 40 winners have set the bar high: Each winner is an example of the best and the... th year, the 40 Under 40 award winners continue to amaze. They’re working on some of the biggest building and engineering projects in the world. They’re focusing on younger professionals, giving them a leg-up in their careers. They’re giving back to the community, often in more ways than one. And while these 40-and-younger dynamos are all vibrant, driven people, they’re just like the rest of us. They love outdoor activities and sporting events. Family is top-of-mind. They’re avid travelers. Their career is not just a job—it’s a passion. As in past years, each winner was nominated by a mentor or colleague. Each works in the building or engineering field, and has risen to the top of their game. And each is superb in his or her own way.]]> Industry Roundup HVAC Electrical Fire & Life Safety Lighting Plumbing Power Commissioning Slider Homepage Item - CSE May Mon, 15 May 2017 10:10:00 -0400 Weekly merger, acquisition, deal update: May 12 http://www.csemag.com/single-article/weekly-merger-acquisition-deal-update-may-12/a1a3ed907bf91f1f277502de6fefa597.html This week Morrissey Goodale reported five deals in the United States and five international deals... Morrissey Goodale reported five deals in the United States and five international deals involving companies from Canada, the U.K., China, and Japan. This week Morrissey Goodale reported five deals in the United States and five international deals involving companies from Canada, the U.K., China, and Japan. Courtesy: Morrissey Goodale M&A Transactions 5/4/2017 NV5 (Hollywood, FL) (ENR #54), announced the acquisition of three firms—Holdrege & Kull (Nevada City, CA), a full-service geotechnical engineering firm, Lochrane Engineering (Orlando, FL), a civil engineering firm, and Energenz (Irvine, CA), an international energy services company. Link to details 3/30/2017 West Yost Associates (Davis, CA) acquired Whitley Burchett and Associates (Walnut Creek, CA), a company that specializes in providing municipal water, wastewater, and recycled water planning, permitting, and design services. Link to details 5/1/2017 Eppstein Uhen Architects (EUA) (Milwaukee, WI) (ENR #340) acquired Burkettdesign (Denver, CO), an architecture and interior design firm. EUA specializes in serving the workplace, healthcare, education, senior living, student housing, and mixed-use markets. Link to details 5/2/2017 ENR's #33 ranked global design firm, Hatch (Mississauga, Canada), acquired g3baxi partnership (Dorking, UK), an employee-owned upstream oil and gas engineering company that provides engineering solutions to oil and gas production problems. Link to details 5/10/2017 Urban development giant, BMEDI (Beijing, China), acquired a 23.83 percent stake in C Cheng Holdings (Hong Kong, Hong Kong), an architectural service provider. Link to details 5/9/2017 Environmental consulting firm, RSK Group (Helsby, UK), acquired Acies Civil and Structural (Runcorn, UK), a property and construction consultancy. Link to details 5/9/2017 Multidisciplinary consulting firm, Waterman Group (London, UK), accepted a takeover offer from CTI Engineering (Tokyo, Japan), ENR's #88 ranked global design firm. Link to details 5/7/2017 Sadler Brown Architects (Newcastle upon Tyne, UK) acquired Anthony Keith Architects (AKA) (Newcastle upon Tyne, UK). The acquisition will allow Sadler Brown to expand and grow their client base while providing an excellent level of design service. Link to details]]> Industry Roundup SyndicationType: Article SyndicationType: Press Release - Non-Commercial SyndicationSource: CFE Media (in-house) SyndicationSource: Content Partner - Morrissey Goodale Syndication: Architectural Engineering Firm Syndication: Design Build Engineering Firm Syndication: Consulting and Specifying Engineering Firm SyndicationTopic: Building Types SyndicationIndustry: Building Automation And Facilities Management Fri, 12 May 2017 08:28:00 -0400 Your questions answered: HVAC: How upcoming part-load efficiency regulations will influence rooftop system designs http://www.csemag.com/single-article/your-questions-answered-hvac-how-upcoming-part-load-efficiency-regulations-will-influence-rooftop-system-designs/01a87ce86d3a2a2497c74c0ee9df8930.html Questions not answered during the April 27, 2017, event are tackled here. Eric Walthall, marketing manager air conditioning scroll compressors at Danfoss in the Greater Atlanta area, tackled unanswered questions from the April 27, 2017, webcast on the upcoming part-load efficiency regulations. Question: How can part-load variable compressors reduce or eliminate the need for hot gas reheat for dehumidification? Eric Walthall: Hot gas bypass is an inefficient way of achieving capacity modulation. Variable speed compressors that are properly designed into a system are excellent at dehumidifying a space because they can precisely meet the capacity, temperature, and humidity requirements. Q: How will part-load operation of compressors affect electrical demand (kW) and energy usage (kWh)? Walthall: For energy consumption, compressors that operate efficiency in part-load, such as variable speed or intermediate discharge valve (IDV) are able to better match the required load through capacity modulation. For electrical demand, variable speed compressors differentiate themselves due to the low inrush current (greatly reduces the high peak when equipment is turned on) and in some high-load cases, the utility can directly increase the setpoint to reduce the overall demand. Q: How much energy can be saved by using a variable speed compressor? Walthall: It depends on what you’re comparing it to (single fixed speed, mechanically modulating, staged, tandem). The most common would be single fixed speed, and variable speed can save more than 30% in energy consumption. Q: What are the details for U.S. Department of Energy Step 1 and DOE step 2 (it was hard to read on the chart/slide)? Walthall: View the website that has the latest DOE ruling for rooftops. If you click on the “Notice of Effective Date and Compliance Dates DFR” link, you can find the table with the 2018 and 2023 IEER minimums. Q: What is IDV? Walthall: IDV stands for intermediate discharge valve. IDV technology allows the compressor to avoid over-compression losses and, thus, extra work by the motor during part-load operation, enabling Danfoss Scrolls DSH and DCJ to save energy and improve IEER from 3% to 10%. Q: Have manufacturers explored MAGLEV technology to reduce friction loses? Walthall: It is a technology that’s being evaluated for several applications, for the reason you listed as well as to eliminate oil in the compressor. Q: How does a compressor with an inverter work? Walthall: Many of the functions are similar to how a fixed-speed compressor operates. The difference is that instead of operating at one frequency (50 or 60 Hz), the variable speed compressor with a drive can now ramp up and down across a speed range. The speed that the compressor is running at a given time is driven by the design of the system, the building load, and the ambient conditions. Q: What are the piping restrictions for field piping distances and vertical heights? Walthall: We define this in our compressor applications guidelines for OEMs to consider when they design a system. It varies by applications, compressor platform, design base, and so on. If there’s a specific case you are curious about, we can get you this detail. Q: With the application of the variable speed technology, are compressor expected usable lifespans improving? Walthall: Not necessarily. We still have the same lifetime spec. Even though the compressor isn’t cycling on and off as much, its run hours are quite a bit more since it is operating in part-load. Many of the internal components (and their lifetimes) are similar between fixed speed and variable speed compressors. Why focused on part-load efficiency? Courtesy: DanfossQ: What types of compressors does your firm make? Walthall: Danfoss makes reciprocating, scroll, and centrifugal compressors. Q: What technologies currently use IDV scroll compressors? Walthall: In terms of applications, rooftops, dedicated outdoor/outside air systems, chillers, ground source heat pumps, and IT cooling. Q: What’s the typical cost premium (as a percent) for a variable speed scroll compressor with a permanent magnet motor compared with an equivalent fixed speed compressor? Walthall: Without getting into detail about pricing, there is a premium for variable speed compressors (IPM motor) versus fixed speed, but it’s typically not the roadblock from a cost standpoint. The major issue is typically the cost of the drive for the variable speed compressor. Q: Are these efficient compressor technologies applicable to rooftop unit (RTU) heat pumps? Walthall: Absolutely. Variable speed especially is very efficient in heating mode for a heat pump. Q: What is the payback for investing in the new technology compared to a baseline of, for example, 2012 IEER of 11? Walthall: As I mentioned during the webcast, it depends on the design of the unit and the profile of the building. Your average payback is 3 to 5 years, but could be as quick as 1 to 2 years. Q: Can we reuse R22 compressors with R134a? Walthall: You will need to refer to the compressor application guidelines to see what refrigerants are qualified for the compressor you’re referring to. Q: When a compressor is discharging through the IDV at part load, is the discharge pressure the same as at full speed? Walthall: No, IDV is completely driven by pressure (no electronics). At full load, the discharge pressure is high enough over the suction pressure that the IDV stays closed (operates like a normal fixed-speed compressor), but as the discharge pressure starts to reduce (part-load), the IDV starts to open. Q: How sophisticated are the controls in an RTU with IDV? Walthall: There are no different controls than today. The IDV opens and closes based on the suction and discharge pressure (driven by the building load and ambient conditions). So, no electronics are used.]]> Slider Homepage Item - CSE HVAC SyndicationType: Webcast SyndicationSource: CFE Media (in-house) Syndication: HVAC (heating ventilation under floor air distribution building enclosures geo-thermal) Syndication: HVAC (air conditioning refrigeration) SyndicationTopic: HVAC Industry Roundup Webcasts & Webinars SyndicationType: Article Mon, 08 May 2017 01:23:00 -0400 Weekly merger, acquisition, deal update: May 5 http://www.csemag.com/single-article/weekly-merger-acquisition-deal-update-may-5/a1bb3c3d9f54e9226c6570d59c3d16c0.html This week Morrissey Goodale reported six deals in the U.S. and three international deals involving... Morrissey Goodale reported six deals in the U.S. and three international deals involving companies from Sweden, France, Australia, and the United Kingdom. This week Morrissey Goodale reported six deals in the U.S. and three international deals involving companies from Sweden, France, Australia, and the United Kingdom. Courtesy: Morrissey Goodale  M&A Transactions 4/28/2017 Global design firm, Stantec (Edmonton, Canada) (ENR #10), acquired Inventrix (Seattle, WA), a 22-person mechanical engineering firm built to deliver modern, intelligent buildings that leverage the latest advancements in systems technology. Link to details 5/3/2017 ENR's #111 ranked design firm, Environmental Science Associates (ESA) (San Francisco, CA), announced that Scheda Ecological Associates (Tampa, FL), an environmental permitting and ecosystem management consulting firm, has joined ESA. Link to details 5/2/2017 Kain Capital (New York, NY) acquired a majority stake in King Engineering Associates (Tampa, FL), a full-service civil engineering firm with expertise in land development, water/wastewater, planning, transportation, ecological, surveying, landscape architecture, and construction management. Link to details 5/1/2017 One of the nation's premier planning and design consulting firms, Kimley-Horn (Raleigh, NC) (ENR #21), acquired Oasis Design Group (Baltimore, MD), a landscape architecture, master planning, and urban design firm. Link to details 4/27/2017 Premier provider of business and technology solutions, RCM Technologies (Pennsauken, NJ) (ENR #176), acquired certain assets of RAF Services (Smithtown, NY), a multi-disciplinary engineering company. Link to details 4/25/2017 Architecture, engineering, and environmental consulting firm, LaBella Associates (Rochester, NY) (ENR #250), acquired Novus Engineering (Delmar, NY) and their subsidiary division Bagdon Environmental. Link to details 5/3/2017 ENR's #32-ranked global design firm, AF Consulting (Stockholm, Sweden), acquired Koncept Stockholm (Stockholm, Sweden), an architecture and urban design firm. Link to details 5/3/2017 ENR's #89 ranked global design firm, Assystem (Paris, France), acquired Engineering Partner Automotive Nordic (Gothenburg, Sweden), a specialist of engineering services rendered to the automotive and industrial markets. Link to details 4/27/2017 EnviroSuite (North Sydney, Australia) entered into a binding agreement to sell its entire Pacific Environment Consulting (North Sydney, Australia) practice to Environmental Resources Management (London, UK), ENR's #14 ranked environmental firm. Link to details]]> Industry Roundup SyndicationType: Article SyndicationType: Press Release - Non-Commercial SyndicationSource: CFE Media (in-house) SyndicationSource: Content Partner - Morrissey Goodale Syndication: Architectural Engineering Firm Syndication: Design Build Engineering Firm Syndication: Consulting and Specifying Engineering Firm SyndicationTopic: Building Types SyndicationIndustry: Building Automation And Facilities Management Fri, 05 May 2017 09:10:00 -0400 Weekly merger, acquisition, deal update: April 28 http://www.csemag.com/single-article/weekly-merger-acquisition-deal-update-april-28/3cc70d28052f1b416092b9c206716596.html This week Morrissey Goodale reported five deals in the U.S. and two international deals involving... Morrissey Goodale reported five deals in the U.S. and two international deals involving companies from Canada and the U.K. This week Morrissey Goodale reported five deals in the U.S. and two international deals involving companies from Canada and the U.K. Courtesy: Morrissey Goodale M&A Transactions 4/20/2017 ENR's #12 ranked global design firm, SNC-Lavalin (Montreal, Canada), is set to buy WS Atkins (Epsom, UK), ENR's #11 ranked global design firm, under a final offer announced on April 20 that both firms' boards have approved. SNC-Lavalin says the offer represents a 35% premium to the closing price of Atkins shares on March 31. Link to details 4/26/2017 Full-service engineering firm, M&S Engineering (Spring Branch, TX), acquired San Antonio Design Group (San Antonio, TX), a civil engineering firm that serves the public and private sectors. Link to details 4/25/2017 Architecture and planning firm, Quinn Evans Architects (Ann Arbor, MI) (ENR #379), acquired Cho Benn Holback + Associates (Baltimore, MD), another architecture and planning firm. Link to details 4/25/2017 Civil engineering firm, Parker Design Group (Roanoke, VA), acquire Stone Engineering Group (Rocky Mount, VA). Stone is another civil engineering firm that serves local businesses and municipalities. Link to details 4/18/2017 Wold Architects and Engineers (St. Paul, MN) acquired Ruck Pate Architecture (Barrington, IL), a firm that focuses on architecture design for K-12, higher education, government and religious clients. Link to details 4/27/2017 Environmental consulting firm, Corporate Environmental Advisors (West Boylston, MA) was acquired by Joseph Campisi (Colchester, CT). Campisi, who has been managing environmental consulting firms for the last 30 years, will act as the new president. Link to details 4/27/2017 Private equity firm, Edwin James Holding (Glasgow, UK), acquired WT Parker (Burton upon Trent, UK), a specialist provider of mechanical, electrical and process engineering services. Link to details]]> Industry Roundup SyndicationType: Press Release - Non-Commercial SyndicationType: Article SyndicationSource: CFE Media (in-house) SyndicationSource: Content Partner - Morrissey Goodale Syndication: Architectural Engineering Firm Syndication: Design Build Engineering Firm Syndication: Consulting and Specifying Engineering Firm SyndicationTopic: Building Types SyndicationIndustry: Building Automation And Facilities Management Fri, 28 Apr 2017 09:18:00 -0400 Top 5 Consulting-Specifying Engineer Articles, April 17-23: Standby power, Prooduct of the Year, building controls, more http://www.csemag.com/single-article/top-5-consulting-specifying-engineer-articles-april-17-23-standby-power-prooduct-of-the-year-building-controls-more/eb5446cf341786bcdbbf9f686c8d9d66.html Articles about standby generator systems, 2017 Product of the Year, building controls, thermal... Consulting-Specifying Engineer's top 5 most read articles online, for April 17 to 23, covered standby generator systems, 2017 Product of the Year, building controls, thermal comfort, and re-commissioning. Link to each article below. 1. Designing emergency and standby generator systems Consulting engineers who specify emergency and standby power equipment understand that installations for mission critical facilities, such as hospitals and data centers, are required to comply with NFPA 110: Standard for Emergency and Standby Power Systems, in conjunction with NFPA 70: National Electrical Code (NEC).  2. 2017 Product of the Year Finalists: Vote for this year's best products Who will win gold in 2017? Consulting-Specifying Engineer announces the finalists for this year's 13th annual Product of the Year competition, and readers will have the final word. Cast your votes online here. 3. Building controls drive smart lighting, HVAC design Driven by market demand to reduce operating costs, the combination of efficient lighting technology, versatile controls, and sophisticated modeling tools offers new opportunities to improve overall building performance. 4. How to address thermal comfort in commercial buildings There are many factors to consider when providing thermal comfort, including being compliant with codes and standards and methods of air distribution. 5. Risk management: Commissioning electrical systems Commissioning electrical systems has become a study of economics and risk. Factors such as capital expenditure, age, safety, reliability, efficiency, and energy costs must be weighed in conjunction with replacement costs and liability risk to formulate and prioritize re-commissioning and retro-commissioning plans. This list was developed using CFE Media's web analytics for stories viewed on www.csemag.com, April 17 to 23, for articles published within the last two months. Joy Chang, digital project manager, CFE Media, jchang@cfemedia.com. ]]> Industry Roundup HVAC Electrical Commissioning Slider Homepage Item - CSE SyndicationType: Article SyndicationSource: CFE Media (in-house) Syndication: Events and Awards (40 Under 40 Product of the Year MEP Giants Career Smart Conference) 2012 POY Mon, 24 Apr 2017 14:05:00 -0400