Vanderbilt Goes Cogen

For more than 15 years, Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn., has been using coal-fired boilers and steam turbines to generate steam for power. Recently, the university added two industrial gas turbines, with heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), to satisfy 30% of the campus load. The 10-megawatt (MW) facility will supply approximately 60,000 lbs.

12/01/2002


For more than 15 years, Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn., has been using coal-fired boilers and steam turbines to generate steam for power. Recently, the university added two industrial gas turbines, with heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), to satisfy 30% of the campus load.

The 10-megawatt (MW) facility will supply approximately 60,000 lbs. of steam to support the heating and cooling systems for both the university and the new Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital located on the south side of the campus. Begun in August 2001, the upgrade to the power plant was completed on May 24, 2002. The units are located inside an unobtrusive new building, which with the exception of the stacks, goes virtually unnoticed by the dormitory located just 100 feet away.

The 5-MW turbines operate on natural gas and utilize a dry low-emission combustor to meet local environmental regulations. The units will primarily be operated in conjunction with the grid, but are capable of operating in island mode and have demonstrated the ability to withstand a complete load rejection, without tripping, and remain on-line. In addition to the equipment, the supplier will be providing plant maintenance for the next six years.

The Children's Hospital itself was created in 1970 and has shared facilities with Vanderbilt University Medical Center. But due to the growing need for advanced health care for children in middle Tennessee, southern Kentucky and northern Alabama, a new free-standing building was started in May 2000 and is scheduled to be completed in mid-2003.

From Pure Power, Winter 2002





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