Gensets Keep Auto Parts Moving, Just in Time

Just-in-time manufacturing has moved from management break-through to standard operating procedure in the automotive industry over the last 20 years. And Android Industries has become a Tier 1 supplier to General Motors as a result of its ability to keep the manufacturer's Flint, Mich., truck-assembly plant supplied with just the right parts, when they're needed.

03/01/2003


Just-in-time manufacturing has moved from management break-through to standard operating procedure in the automotive industry over the last 20 years. And Android Industries has become a Tier 1 supplier to General Motors as a result of its ability to keep the manufacturer's Flint, Mich., truck-assembly plant supplied with just the right parts, when they're needed. Android's distribution center has achieved a 99.975% accuracy rating in its outbound shipments, due to its ability to pick, pack and ship orders as required, sometimes within 72 minutes of receipt.

GM depends on this record for its own operations. Missing or out-of-sequence parts can force the auto manufacturer to shut down an entire line for hours. With these kinds of economic consequences, Android can't afford to let power outages stand in its way.

"There is no question that, with all of our critical applications, we need to have a reliable power source that will keep our electricity on all the time," says Android representative Brian McDonnell. "The loss of power for even a few hours could mean a loss of thousands of dollars for our business."

An 800 kW modular power system, comprising two paralleled 400-kW generator sets, keeps the company's products moving even when utility power isn't available. In consulting with DTE Energy Technologies, Farminton Hills, Mich., Android discovered this modular approach would be less expensive—and more quickly installed—than a single, 800-kW engine. Because Android faced an immediate need, the shorter installation lead time was a critical factor in the company's decision. The units were shipped in eight weeks, with installation and testing taking only two days.

From Pure Power, Spring 2003





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