Exhaust Grilles in Anesthetizing Locations

Some jurisdictions have state health regulations that require smoke-exhaust grilles in the ceiling of an anesthetizing location. Isolation dampers are required to isolate the return duct from the exhaust duct. Either a return/relief fan or a separate exhaust fan could be used to remove smoke.However, preliminary testing of this approach has produced mixed results.

01/01/2001


Some jurisdictions have state health regulations that require smoke-exhaust grilles in the ceiling of an anesthetizing location. Isolation dampers are required to isolate the return duct from the exhaust duct. Either a return/relief fan or a separate exhaust fan could be used to remove smoke.

However, preliminary testing of this approach has produced mixed results. With the low air velocity exiting the laminar-flow air devices, the exhaust-air pattern has been shown in cold smoke tests to short circuit and leave a lower level of smoke-table height and below-within the room. Warm smoke may have a better chance of being drawn out at the ceiling level, but the short-circuit possibility still exists. Smoke generated at the table level from surgical drape fires might be drawn across the staff on its way to the ceiling exhaust or left at the lower level.

This removal concept matches the smoke-management techniques applied to atriums and other spaces, where the smoke is directed upwards and the lower six feet of egress space is maintained clear of smoke. The main difference is that in atriums supply air is introduced at the lower level during smoke-removal scenarios while air is supplied at the ceiling in operating rooms at all times.

Further testing is required to ensure proper and safe smoke removal using the typical ceiling-exhaust technique.





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