EPA Unveils Program

The Kyoto Protocol, which the Bush Administration has refused to agree to, calls for all major industrial nations to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 5.2% from 2008 to 2012, based upon 1990 levels. As an alternative, Bush and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have created what they call the "Climate Partners" program which directs member companies to complete a corporate-wide gre...

05/01/2002


The Kyoto Protocol, which the Bush Administration has refused to agree to, calls for all major industrial nations to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 5.2% from 2008 to 2012, based upon 1990 levels.

As an alternative, Bush and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have created what they call the "Climate Partners" program which directs member companies to complete a corporate-wide greenhouse gas inventory and then work with the EPA to set an emissions reduction target.

Thus far, the program has recruited 17 corporations, including General Motors, Lockheed Martin and Bethlehem Steel. These participating companies also have the option of reporting and receiving credit for these reductions according to a registry, to be developed by the U.S. Dept. of Energy.

"The companies that participate in this program—promising to meet a higher standard than other companies in their sector—are showing true leadership as environmental stewards," says EPA Administrator Christie Whitman.

Even though some associations, such as the Air-Conditioning & Refrigeration Institute (ARI), Arlington, Va., have yet to officially endorse EPA's program, they have expressed interest.

"We're excited about EPA's voluntary 'Climate Leaders' program and its support of a cleaner environment," comments Deborah Miller, vice president of governmental affairs for ARI.





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