Attention Engineers: It's Time to Take the Lead

With a strong set of technical skills, engineers are uniquely poised to influence community affairs and play shape public policy and influencing community affairs. However, engineers tend to spend more time in the back room than in the board room. In his new book, Forks in the Road, consulting engineer Richard Weingardt, P.E., sets out to change that by encouraging engineers to step forward into the public realm and take on more leadership roles in society.

12/17/2001


With a strong set of technical skills, engineers are uniquely poised to influence community affairs and play a key role in the shaping of public policy. However, engineers tend to spend more time in the back room than in the board room.

In his new book, Forks in the Road , consulting engineer Richard Weingardt, P.E., sets out to change that by encouraging engineers to step forward into the public realm and take on more leadership roles in society.

"Run things, don't just make things run," urges Weingardt, because, in his opinion, the world is run by those who show up.

Weingardt, chairman of Richard Weingardt Consultants, Denver—and a past president of the American Consulting Engineers Council—also argues that if the U.S. hopes to maintain its economic and technological strengths, the technical input of engineers is crucial.

"With engaging gusto and contagious enthusiasm, Richard Weingardt calls upon his fellow engineers to 'show up,' become involved and take leadership responsibilities," said Samuel C. Florman, a partner with Kreisler, Borg, Florman, in Scarsdale, N.Y.

Weingardt also offers business advice and autobiographical information about his own career as an engineer and community leader.

For more information on the book, contact Palamar Publishing at 303-671-0709.





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